Windows 10 on iMac

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The iPhone app lets me change many settings including volume, bass, treble, midrange, and some of the built-in programs like Music, Noise, sound focus, etc. But the fundamental frequency response curve is set by the audiologist.

To do my own programming I will have to buy a bluetooth interface device for my computer in addition the software. And I will need a Windows 10 computer. So I'm not committed to that course of action yet... just investigating.

There is a Hearing Aid forum much like the Nikon Cafe and quite a few members there have reported great success in doing their own programming.
It all sounds encouraging, doesn't it!! Good luck with the process. You don't make decisions lightly, so when you do make one, it will be one that will be good for you.
 
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I've already had these hearing aids for a 30-day trial and I'm sure these are the right ones to replace my 11-year-old models. Unfortunately they were only available then on a model with rechargeable batteries. That won't work for me with our travel schedule as the rechargeable batteries only last for 16-24 hours.

The disposable battery models should be available next month.
 
I've heard that some brands offer hearing aids with the flexibility to use either rechargeable batteries (stick the hearing aid(s) into a special case at night for recharging) or when traveling, to simply use off-the-shelf non-rechargeable/disposable batteries at any time they are needed. My BAHA 5s only offer the option to use the standard disposable batteries, and the darned batteries (312s, much smaller than the 13s I used to need for my older BAHAs) are a bit awkward to handle if one does not have good finger dexterity. Since many older people do NOT have good manual dexterity, it seems to me as though going with rechargeable batteries is something which could be really beneficial in the future. Maybe in five years, when according to Medicare and my insurance company, I'll be ready for my next upgrade to whatever is available at that time, one feature will be rechargeable batteries...... That said, for pretty much most of my life, since I was six years old, I've automatically carried spare hearing aid batteries around with me, in pockets and purses......it really would feel weird not to do that any more!
 
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These only come with rechargeable or, eventually, size 13s which I have used for many years.

We don't have Medicare Advantage so I don't get any help in purchasing aids.
 
Right; most people don't. The reason I do is because I was born with Treacher Collins Syndrome, including bilateral microtia and atresia and have always needed to use bone conduction hearing aids. As a child, I wore rather a large bulky body aid with an oscillator attached to a steel headband; over time, the body aids became smaller and eventually I went to a BTE which was specially modified to accommodate the bone conduction oscillator. Still needed the steel headband and still could wear only one aid because of the logistics. In the mid-1980's I started hearing about something called a "BAHA"/Bone-anchored hearing aid, which at that time was not yet available in the US; it eventually did undergo clinical trials and was FDA approved for use by adults some time in the 1990's. In the year 2000 I once again started hearing more about this device and right away the first thing that occurred to me was, "hey, I could have TWO of these!" One on each side....true bilateral hearing..... Wow......

The logistics of the headband and oscillator and all that were not factors with the BAHA, as it was and is a system consisting of a small screw implanted into the mastoid bone on one or both sides, an "abutment" which screws into that and which then serves as the means of snapping the sound processor on to it, with, voila, bone conduction going straight to the bone and then passing sound to the cochleas..... In 2001 I had the implantation surgery on both sides and about three months later finally the day came when the audiologist snapped the two sound processors into place on my head and for the first time in my life I heard with aids bilaterally. Sure, I can hear a little without any aids, but I really need amplification and now I had it on each side. There's a reason people have two ears..... Wow, what a difference! The sound quality of the pure bone conduction with no interference from skin/tissue layers in between was amazing, too, but what really made everything worthwhile was that ability to finally hear the world loud and clear from both sides, not just one side of my head with all the sound pouring into one measly oscillator.

Here it is now, almost nineteen years since I had that surgery which truly was a life-changer for me and I am still marveling over it.... Yes, it made THAT much of a difference. Anyway, the point of going into all of this was to say that although my insurance did not pay for the sound processors, but did cover the surgery when I had it in 2001, later on Medicare began offering coverage for replacement sound processors, and the paperwork coding is very specific when the claim is being submitted for coverage. As I asked back in 2001 while writing the check to pay for the sound processors, what's the point of having a surgical procedure and then not being able to put the sound processors on to complete the system? That's what makes it all work in the first place. So with Medicare and some insurance companies the surgery and the sound processors are now considered as being a sort of "replacement" or "prosthetic" in lieu of normally-functioning internal and external ears due to some physical issue(s). That is why when back in October I got my latest BAHAs, I only had to pay a fraction (the deductible) of what the full cost of the things was, thankfully. In the UK, from what I've heard, the NHS covers everything, including batteries, for people who wear either regular hearing aids or BAHAs. In the US we still have to pay for our own batteries, and most people have to pay for their hearing aids, although I believe there is specific coverage for children up to the age of 21 or 22, as it is recognized that the ability to communicate from the very youngest age is truly important, and if hearing aids are needed, they are provided and costs either fully or partially covered.

It looks as though now at some point in the future Medicare may actually begin to cover some of the costs of hearing aids for people who need them but who don't require a surgical procedure for them, and who may have various reasons for the hearing loss in the first place, including aging- related issues. I really hope that this comes to fruition, as hearing loss can be very detrimental, especially as one gets older, and it is a real shame to have the expense of hearing aids being a primary and huge barrier to someone being able to communicate with his or her family and friends and hear what they are saying.
 
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I use Signia, they are Wonderful with the iPhone. And not cheap I might add.

I run Win10 on a Macbook Air using Bootcamp, which is free. Use it with my amateur radio (HAM) software and all works great. HOWEVER... it required a separate partition for the PC stuff. My 120gb SSD has both APFS and NTFS partitions. The only backup software I could find that will backup both partitions on a single pass is Acronis True Image 2020. Any other solution required separate backups, separate drives, for each partition. Messy but doable.
 
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I use Signia, they are Wonderful with the iPhone. And not cheap I might add.

I run Win10 on a Macbook Air using Bootcamp, which is free. Use it with my amateur radio (HAM) software and all works great. HOWEVER... it required a separate partition for the PC stuff. My 120gb SSD has both APFS and NTFS partitions. The only backup software I could find that will backup both partitions on a single pass is Acronis True Image 2020. Any other solution required separate backups, separate drives, for each partition. Messy but doable.
Thanks for the information, Ron. Do you know if Bluetooth can connect to the Windows OS?

Did you try SuperDuper! for your backups? Sounds like you probably did.
 
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Thanks for the information, Ron. Do you know if Bluetooth can connect to the Windows OS?

Did you try SuperDuper! for your backups? Sounds like you probably did.
Hi Jim. Hearing aids Bluetooth is not standard Bluetooth. Apple, and I assume Android, have apps that bypass regular Bluetoooth and connect directly to the aids. In order for Windows or iOS to connect an intermediate device is used. That device speaks both types of Bluetooth.

SuperDuper! only sees the APFS partition on the Macbook Air. I do use both Acronis TI and SuperDuper! (and Time Machine) to back up my Mac Mini, cannot be too careful.
 
Ron is right, that the BT used in the iOS app is somewhat different, which is why I have the app on my iPhone and iPads but not in the computer, and will need to use the mini-mic doohickey and set that up with the computer in order to take advantage of BT there to stream my music and sounds to the two BAHAs. Right now that app is only for iOS devices and people who have Android have to use the Mini-Mic in order to stream their music from their phones and tablets. I assume that the mini-mic is that intermediate device which Ron mentions. I don't know if other hearing device manufacturers have Android apps which will work for their users or not. Apple has always been mindful of accessibility issues and early-on began working with the various hearing aid companies to ensure functionality between their hearing aids and Apple iOS devices.
 

Growltiger

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Signia have Android apps for their aids.
They also have a device called Streamline-mic which will connect any computer or other device with (normal) Bluetooth to their hearing aids which support Bluetooth (using Bluetooth LE). In addition it can work as a remote microphone, so it can be attached to a person making a speech and the sound will be transmitted to the aids of the person using them at the back of the audience.
Don't forget that not every device has Bluetooth hardware included. Some desktop computers don't. In those cases a little Bluetooth adapter can be plugged in to a USB socket.
 
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P.s. VMWare Fusion says it can only provide an outgoing bluetooth connection. I would need a two-way connection to adjust settings in the hearing aids.

If VMWare can't do it I doubt that VirtualBox can either.
 
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P.s. VMWare Fusion says it can only provide an outgoing bluetooth connection. I would need a two-way connection to adjust settings in the hearing aids.

If VMWare can't do it I doubt that VirtualBox can either.
I searched their documentation and could not find any references to BlueTooth though their forums have references.
 

Growltiger

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Like I said at the start, I suspect you will need a real PC if you really want to do what is normally the job of the audiologist.

I have seen the whole process done, and to do it properly you need a soundproof chamber, calibrated volumes, special software on the computer to generate the various test sounds, and a button for the user to press when they hear a sound. The data is then processed to create a profile of hearing capability, by frequency and volume. That profile is then converted into the base programming for the hearing aids. The additional custom profiles such as music/outdoors/voice/theatre and so on are simply tweaks on top of the base profile.

It simply isn't possible to create an accurate base profile without that sort of setup. I can't understand about an audiologist whispering nowadays. It needs a proper scientific approach to allow modern hearing aids to work to their full capability.

The ones I saw being programmed recently were the latest high-end Signia ones, with rechargeable batteries, portable lithium battery pack that can recharge them without needing mains power, bluetooth, universal streaming device, and apps for iOS and Android. I thought them quite expensive, over £3000 which is about $4000. (P.S. This was the discounted price at Specsavers - the list price was a lot more.)

By the way the NHS here does provide free hearing aids for all, but they are very basic low spec ones, nothing like those Signia ones.
 
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Yes, the sound chamber is used for doing the audiogram and also the individual being tested must be positioned so that he or she cannot see the audiologist and inadvertently be able to read his or her lips. Everything is done through the testing devices. Once the audiogram has been completed, then the programming for the actual sound processors the person will be wearing is done, and that is a different process, where the audiologist uses his or her special software in the computer. Yeah, sound processors these days are not inexpensive! That is what makes this so difficult for people who are financially unable to manage paying out-of-pocket for their devices. My pair of new BAHA 5s were $10,000 (yep, $5,000 per device) and that is why I'm thankful that I only had to cover around $2,000 of that! Without them or any sort of hearing instruments at all my life would be vastly different.
 
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I'm not going into this naively. I've been wearing hearing aids nearly forty years and have had many audiograms done over the years, including one a couple of months ago. I would only be making slight tweaks to what the audiologist has already programmed.

However, considering that I would have to buy a PC dedicated to just this task I will probably not be doing it. As my beginning statement said, I am considering it. I do get frustrated with the tweaks the audiologist makes which I can't really test until I leave his office. On my temporary trial in December the last adjustment he made left me with unacceptable audio feedback which didn't show up until after I got home, requiring another appointment and visit a week later.

These Phonak Marvels will cost around $6k.
 

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