Critique Wine glasses and wine corks

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The tabletop and background are a single sheet of translucent vellum. A large continuous-light lamp with four of its five lights turned on was behind the background shining toward the subjects and camera. That lamp outlined the glasses in dark tones. A small continuous-light lamp above the scene lit the corks and front area of the tabletop.


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Thanks, Karen!

Especially the bear on a bicycle! LOL!
My wife also loves that cork, which explains why I made it stand out in the scene. That cork comes with a bottle of Pinot Noir that we regularly enjoy for daily drinking. Notice that another copy of the same cork laying on its side is two corks to the left of the one that is standing up.
 
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Excellent work, Mike!
I really like the tension between the meticulously spaced glasses and the (organized) chaos of the corks.
The way the light plays in the glasses accentuates the symmetry for me.
 
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Thank you, Glenn!

I especially like how you decided to crop the wine glasses.
It was fortuitous due to an unrelated practicality that that was my plan from the outset: The lamp that lit the corks and front area of the tabletop produced direct reflections almost entirely in the upper part of the glasses not included in the frame; if I had wanted to include the upper part of the glasses, I probably would have had to have made the extra effort of doing a lot of cloning to get rid of the reflections or making the image a composite of two captures -- one that was ideal for lighting the glasses and one that was ideal for lighting the corks.
 
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Thank you, Glenn!



It was fortuitous due to an unrelated practicality that that was my plan from the outset: The lamp that lit the corks and front area of the tabletop produced direct reflections almost entirely in the upper part of the glasses not included in the frame; if I had wanted to include the upper part of the glasses, I probably would have had to have made the extra effort of doing a lot of cloning to get rid of the reflections or making the image a composite of two captures -- one that was ideal for lighting the glasses and one that was ideal for lighting the corks.
I just assumed your wife had broken the tops off the glasses, again! :D
 
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Thanks, Binnur!

The glass in the middle looks kind of pale, is it on purpose?
That is the result of the physics of light in this particular situation, which is a combination of lots of factors too boring to explain. (Similarly, if I had used a dark background to outline the glass in bright tones, the center glass would also have been outlined in tones that are less bright.) In theory I could have changed the setup to render the center glass in darker tones, though I actually don't know if I have enough space in the limited size of my makeshift studio to make that happen. Alternatively, I could have simply darkened those tones during post-processing. I decided to leave the tones as is because I felt that they added interest and depth to the image. On a different day in a different mood I could have just as easily made the decision to darken them.
 
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Thanks, Binnur!



That is the result of the physics of light in this particular situation, which is a combination of lots of factors too boring to explain. (Similarly, if I had used a dark background to outline the glass in bright tones, the center glass would also have been outlined in tones that are less bright.) In theory I could have changed the setup to render the center glass in darker tones, though I actually don't know if I have enough space in the limited size of my makeshift studio to make that happen. Alternatively, I could have simply darkened those tones during post-processing. I decided to leave the tones as is because I felt that they added interest and depth to the image. On a different day in a different mood I could have just as easily made the decision to darken them.
Thanks Mike. After reading your explanation I have noticed that the lighting from behind is stronger in the center . I think as a result,the center glass looks pale .
 
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the lighting from behind is stronger in the center
Yes, when using one lamp, when photographing a scene that is wider than the lamp's reflector, and when the scene is as close to the lamp as in this situation, the light will always be noticeably brighter in the center. That's despite that I didn't turn on the one bulb located in the center of the lamp. Indeed, lots of factors as mentioned above!
 

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