Wine

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May 5, 2005
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I agree that Nick owes us a much more complete report at some point.

In the meantime I will elaborate a bit more on yesterday's Italian wine tasing.

The first wine was a red Lambrusco Spumante from Emilia-Romagna, a blend of Montericco, Marano, Maestri, and Malbo Gentile grapes. I had never heard of any of them. The wine was listed as "Extra Brut", but it was not bone dry.

The second was a Spumante made from Chardonnay grapes in Emilia-Romagna. Brut and very dry.

Third was a Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi from Marche which is pretty well known.

Fourth: Casale del Giglio Bellone from Lazio. My favorite of the whites, and the least expensive wine in the tasting ($15).

Fifth was the Garofoli 100% Montepulciano which I remarked on earlier. From Marche.

Sixth, Tenuta Colombarola Travini Gandinaia from Emilia-Romagna made from Syrah grapes dried similarly to Amarone. It had sweetish overtones which turned me off, but the proprietor of the wine shop expects it to be a big seller at $20.

Seventh was the Falesco Montiano 2012 from Lazio, 100% single-vineyard Merlot. I liked this a lot, but at $49 it is outside my price range.

Finally, Casale del Giglio, Mater Matuta from Lazio. Inky dark and full-bodied but it had a strange taste to my palate. I didn't mind it also being outside my price range at $50.

There are 24 people in the class, and they bought out all of the bottles shown in my picture. One fellow asked for a full case of the Casale del Giglio. :eek:
 
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Wife knocking back the good stuff: Troon Vineyards in southern OR.
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Zinfandel grapes at Troon awaiting harvest (heard they were running crazy today to beat the rain)
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Son appreciating the finer things in life.
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Fascinating article, consistent with everything I have been seen about the impact of the changing climate on making wine. Thanks for sharing it with us!

It's especially interesting that bubbly is being made now in England. Bubbly Champagne was initially made primarily for the British market because the French preferred still wine made in Champagne. Thomas Jefferson was America's ambassador to France at the time, having replaced Benjamin Franklin, and he agreed.
 
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It's Monday again...

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Several interesting wines today. The first one on the left tasted oxidized to me, but the instructor and wineshop owner apparently didn't agree. In a restaurant I would have returned it.

The Chianti Classico Reserva from Badia a Coltibuono was excellent, and both the Brunello and Vino Nobile de Montepulciano were like nectar. The Fobiano was a Bordeaux-style blend that was quite good and probably excellent value compared to comparable wines from Bordeaux.

The last wine on the right was a sweet wine from Elba, supposed to be an ideal companion to dark chocolate. In fact, samples of a special dark chocolate were served with it. I don't care for chocolate and the wine was terrible to my palate.

The second wine from the left was a very pleasant "orange" trebbiano from Umbria. The juice was left on the skins long enough to achieve a very light orange color. I liked it.
 
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You didn't mention the Argiolas Korem. Good? Bad? In between?
Good catch. I found that wine to be quite enjoyable, too, just not quite up to the standard of the Chianti, Brunello, and Montepulciano. It was fairly soft and "chewy" but a bit tannic. Will improve with age. It is a blend of Bovale and Cannonau, which the leader says is really Grenache.
 
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Joined
Sep 13, 2007
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Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
Friends gave me a bottle of Italian red wine and I can't find anything about it, though I didn't look very hard. Everything on the label is in Italian and I haven't taken the time to run it through a translator. The one detail I have determined is that it's a non-vintage wine. I remember having only one still wine that is non-vintage and that was decades ago, so that alone makes it interesting.
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
21,224
Location
SW Virginia
Friends gave me a bottle of Italian red wine and I can't find anything about it, though I didn't look very hard. Everything on the label is in Italian and I haven't taken the time to run it through a translator. The one detail I have determined is that it's a non-vintage wine. I remember having only one still wine that is non-vintage and that was decades ago, so that alone makes it interesting.
Could you post a picture of the label?
 
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
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Could you post a picture of the label?
First, I'll run the information on the label through a translator and I'll also look harder for information about the wine. If doing that still leaves us guessing, I'll post a photo. However, the front label has only one word, Guido. The rear label indicates Platinetti Guido. Nothing else helpful on the rear other than the alcohol by volume (13.5%). The stuff written in Italian is on a side label, and that position is certainly rare and interesting in itself.
 
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