Wine

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Sep 13, 2007
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Maybe, but too many domestics have too much sugar and not enough acid, while others (southern hemisphere) are the opposite. Germans seem to find that fabulous balance that also brings with it a body to stand up to strong stuff.
I don't remember having any southern hemisphere Rieslings, so I don't know about them. I agree with you about your assessment of the Germain and domestic wines. There is always the exception and I found some in the New York Finger Lakes region when I vacationed there last year.
 
Joined
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That's a gem, Ted!

When I was a volunteer at an American Heart Association fundraising event, I was pouring Bordeaux wines and I got to meet an executive of Lynch-Bages, who had donated some wine. I asked how the winery's name is supposed to be pronounced. He explained that there is one pronunciation generally used in the rural areas and another one in the cities, but I don't remember either one of them.

Wine Spectator's tasting notes in 2007: 94 points. "This vintage was a modern benchmark for the estate. Intense aromas and flavors of berry, currant, mint and light toasty oak. Full, round and refined, with a long, long finish. Gorgeous. Drinking beautifully."

The release price was $13 and you probably got it for less at a futures price. I see prices now in a range of $325 to $550.
 
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Here's the planned bottle for this weekend's dinner. The last of a case I bought on futures in '84.

View attachment 1651414Lynch Bages '82 by Ted, on Flickr
I envy you that. Hope it's a grand dinner.

I do note that the level in the bottle looks a bit low, undoubtedly from evaporation through the cork. I'm sure you know to let it breathe for a while before serving. Maybe decant it, too.
 
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I wouldn't do either with a Bordeaux that is 37 years old unless the decanting is done purely to separate the sediment from the liquid. What am I missing?
I'm just giving advice from experience. Quite a few years ago I was visiting a friend who opened a very old Bordeaux he had inherited from his father-in-law. The cork crumbled as it came out, and the wine smelled awful. We wrote it off as a bad experience, but instead of throwing it away he decanted it carefully and let it sit uncovered. After an hour it smelled much better. After two hours it smelled wonderful and was one of the best wines I have ever tasted.

I've had similar experiences, though not quite as extreme, with other old red wines.
 
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I never have the discipline to keep wine for so long without drinking it. The oldest wine I've ever had was 14 years old and I probably owned it only about two years, maybe less. I bought a 2013 Mondavi Cab made from the To Kalon vineyard when it was released in 2017 that I'll keep until 2033 to celebrate my 50th anniversary if I'm lucky enough to live that long. Even that wine will be only 20 years old when we drink it.
 
Joined
Jun 3, 2009
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Chicago "burbs"
The level looks quite good for a wine of that vintage. I would keep it at a 45 degree angle until opening to allow the sediment to collect before decanting. My '82 Lunch Bag is sadly long gone. I did enjoy an '82 Mouton for my son's promotion last year. Still have 2x750's left. Amazing wine that will probably last another 20 years.
 
Joined
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I usually don't decant wines unless, like Jim said, they come off initially as a bit funky. I do allow them to stand before opening and then pray. I had two cases of '82s - Lynch Bages and Grand Puy Lacoste and this is the last bottle. I opened the last Grand Puy Lacoste about 18 years ago with my oldest friend. Before he succumbed to cancer he mentioned it was the best wine he ever had.

I hope to share this at a dinner party with a newer friend and our wives. I met him at a jazz concert a few years ago where he noticed we were using the same lens.

I paid $12/bottle for the Lynch Bages and $11 for the Grand Puy Lacoste. I've seen the Lynch Bages on several wine lists this year for $1,000. Pretty good buy!
 
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Wine Spectator sent me an email today: "The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative has announced that it is considering new, higher tariffs on European foods, including all wines (both still and sparkling, regardless of alcohol level). Those tariffs, which would be imposed early next year, could be as high as 100 percent," citing that a "25 percent tariff [is] already in place on many wines."
 

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