Wine

Joined
May 27, 2005
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Clearwater, Florida
Every once in a while I force myself to try some varietals other than my typical Cabernet or Malbec. Obviously I must be missing out on all these other grapes have to offer with their glowing reviews. The most common offender is Pinot Noir. When I read the reviews touting the complexity and lushness of these wines I get tempted.

Last night's example was a 2017 Bergstrom Pinot Noir from Oregon. Beautiful, dense color! I was optimistic. Interesting floral nose was nice. Then the first few sips. Thin, delicate and with almost no finish. Any "complexity" of this wine was obviously lost on my uneducated palate.

Have I ruined my taste buds by primarily drinking big, opulent Cabernets? Obviously I will need to rethink my retirement plans to become a world renown sommelier if I think a highly regarded Pinot tastes like dilute grape juice.
 
Joined
Jun 3, 2009
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Chicago "burbs"
Every once in a while I force myself to try some varietals other than my typical Cabernet or Malbec. Obviously I must be missing out on all these other grapes have to offer with their glowing reviews. The most common offender is Pinot Noir. When I read the reviews touting the complexity and lushness of these wines I get tempted.

Last night's example was a 2017 Bergstrom Pinot Noir from Oregon. Beautiful, dense color! I was optimistic. Interesting floral nose was nice. Then the first few sips. Thin, delicate and with almost no finish. Any "complexity" of this wine was obviously lost on my uneducated palate.

Have I ruined my taste buds by primarily drinking big, opulent Cabernets? Obviously I will need to rethink my retirement plans to become a world renown sommelier if I think a highly regarded Pinot tastes like dilute grape juice.
In the end it's what you like to drink Mitch. A few my fellow wine snobs refer to pinot noir/burgundies as "sissy wines". Truth be told, I only have a few pinots in my cellar and they were given to me. I like pinot noir but I LOVE cabernet. So I buy and cellar cabernet and guess what, I drink cabernet. In the end it's all about what you like. To you and your family's health, enjoy. 🍷 :)🍷
 
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
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17,796
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Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
Have I ruined my taste buds by primarily drinking big, opulent Cabernets?
It's more likely that you haven't trained your taste buds but I'm not even sure they can be trained, which reminds me of a story about Brussel sprouts. I couldn't stand the taste of them and didn't eat any for about 30 years. Then one day I visited my friend and he served them for supper. I ate every single sprout. That was when I thanked him for serving them. They were just awful, so in thanking him for serving them, I explained that I then knew that I shouldn't waste my time trying Brussel sprouts again the rest of my life. Perhaps you should consider the same about wines you've never liked.

By the way, my friend was such a bad cook that one of the speakers at his memorial service mentioned it.
 
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Joined
Sep 13, 2007
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Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
I've concluded that the best value in red wine might be any Amarone that is inexpensive relative to typical costs for that wine. Every time I've bought Amarone for about $20, I've assumed it really wouldn't be as good as a typically priced Amarone ($40 - $80). That assumption has always been right. More important, every inexpensive Amarone I've bought has been better than a wine made from the same grapes at the same cost.
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2005
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28,033
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Moscow, Idaho
Every single wine drinker that I know has biases, myself included. Region, state, old world/new world, varietal/blend, grape, age, style, price and more are all reasons to love or hate a wine. And I've always said, taste is a matter of taste. For example, my wife and I love German Rieslings, of all styles, but we can't say the same about Rieslings from most other regions, especially domestic ones. Are we biased? Many blind tastings say, NO. So, it's just a matter preference.
For years I was part of the "anti-Pinot" brigade and felt that the ones I liked I couldn't afford, and ones I could afford I didn't like. A trip to Burgundy in the late 90's , and the rantings of Robert Parker reinforced that belief! But over time I got to really love Pinot—it's such a great food wine.

PS: I love Brussels sprouts!
 
Joined
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Clearwater, Florida
I stopped trying Chateauneuf du Pape wines years ago. I've never liked them. I'm a lot closer to the end of my life than the beginning of my life, so I'm not going to waste any more time trying them when I could instead be drinking wine I enjoy.
Funny, Mike. You posted this as I was typing about Châteauneuf-du-Pape. My wife had a mentor while we were in training who fancied himself an expert on CdP wines. He visited the region often and built a large cellar in his home devoted to the varietal. He could recite the 12 different grape varietals in each wine as he tasted them on different parts of his tongue and palate. As hard as he tried to convert us, my wife and I would often return home with a sense of "Meh". I knew I could open any number of $10 Cabs I had (1990 at that time) that I would enjoy more. I still ask my wife jokingly if she would like to try the CdP when they appear on the wine list in restaurants.
 
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We all know that our spouse's are always right. I have a magnet on my refridgerator which reads "Happy wife, Happy Life!"

But, my vegan wife has now thrown a major monkey wrench into my wine consumption. Apparently, there are wines that use animal products in the fining process. Very common in white wines, but also quite prevalent in many reds to use products like egg whites and even gelatin in this stage. Well, this is a problem if you are a vegan.

There is even an extensive web site resource listing which wines are vegan.
https://www.barnivore.com/

Ok, so going forward, I have to check with the web site or even call the winery to check if their wines are made with animal products before I purchase. But what to do with some of my existing collection which has many wines that are not vegan. BV and Opus1 both use egg whites in their fining process. I've collected these for years! Saved some of these even for special occasions. Fortunately, my wines from Scarecrow and Flora Springs are vegan.
 

Butlerkid

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Rutledge, Tennessee
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We all know that our spouse's are always right. I have a magnet on my refridgerator which reads "Happy wife, Happy Life!"

But, my vegan wife has now thrown a major monkey wrench into my wine consumption. Apparently, there are wines that use animal products in the fining process. Very common in white wines, but also quite prevalent in many reds to use products like egg whites and even gelatin in this stage. Well, this is a problem if you are a vegan.

There is even an extensive web site resource listing which wines are vegan.
https://www.barnivore.com/

Ok, so going forward, I have to check with the web site or even call the winery to check if their wines are made with animal products before I purchase. But what to do with some of my existing collection which has many wines that are not vegan. BV and Opus1 both use egg whites in their fining process. I've collected these for years! Saved some of these even for special occasions. Fortunately, my wines from Scarecrow and Flora Springs are vegan.
Vegan wines Who knew...... not me......
 
Joined
Apr 30, 2006
Messages
2,386
Location
colorado
Today is a big day : 🍷🍷🍷 ( Beaujolais Nouveau Day is marked in France on the third Thursday in November with fireworks, music and festivals. Under French law, the wine is released at 12:01 a.m., just weeks after the wine's grapes have been harvested. Parties are held throughout the country and further afield to celebrate the first wine of the season. )🍷🍷🍷
 
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
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Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
Does your wife require that everything must be "100% vegan?"

As an example, I have a good friend who is a celiac. He avoided all wine for about a year that had ever been stored in wooden barrels because the materials used to bind the slats of wood to each other contain gluten, which could get into the wine. Duiring that period I came across only about two red wines that had not been stored in wood, though it's a lot easier to find white wine never stored in wood. Then some studies were done that concluded that though the gluten is indeed present in the wine, it is such a small quantity that it can't hurt anyone even who has celiac disease. He returned to drinking wine and all of his tests related to celiac disease that he has taken since then indicate that he's doing just fine. He's also no longer experiencing the symptoms that led to the diagnosis of his celiac disease.
 
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