Wine

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Its richness demands food. Big Cabs do too, Barolo, as well...

I am in 100% agreement with you on that, in fact that is one reason why the Amarone and Barolo in my cellar have been there so long. We rarely have food that would fit with them.

..but the modern style that is now in vogue makes them easier to drink alone.

And I agree with you there, too. I don't buy high-end wines, but the current style, especially in California, seems to be fruity and sweet for easy sipping. Suits my wife, but not me.
 
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Corkscrews
Excuse me while I change the subject. Lettie Teague's wine column in today's online Wall Street Journal is about corkscrews. Since I've never been really happy with the one I've been using the last several years, I was interested.

This is the one she recommends in the moderate price category. Have any of you tried anything like it?

Then, back to the regularly scheduled programming...
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2005
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Moscow, Idaho
Corkscrews
Excuse me while I change the subject. Lettie Teague's wine column in today's online Wall Street Journal is about corkscrews. Since I've never been really happy with the one I've been using the last several years, I was interested.

This is the one she recommends in the moderate price category. Have any of you tried anything like it?was

Then, back to the regularly scheduled programming…
I have 3 corkscrews:
1. Traditional waiters, 2-step. Works well, but synthetic corks are murder on it—bends the screw. But the corkscrew is inexpensive, $5-8.
2. An AH-SO, 2 prong. Works great with old corks. Doesn't always sit well with Italian bottles which have thinner necks or thinner glass in the neck. The result is a piece of art for Mike to photograph.
3. A rabbit lever pull. Very similar to the one mentioned, but with a lever that you push down to screw in the cork, and up to remove it.

I used to have one like the one in the advert—it was called the "ScrewPull" and their slogan was, "Why be Screwpulless" Works well, but slower than all 3 above, and the teflon wears off the screw rendering the thing inoperable.
 
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but the current style, especially in California, seems to be fruity and sweet for easy sipping. Suits my wife, but not me.

I've gotten that way about Zins and Washington Syrah—ripe and alcoholic. Both are grapes I dearly love, but not at those saturated levels! But give me one that's at 14% or below, with acid and spice— I can go all day!
 
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That corkscrew, Jim, worked better than most but still faltered with composite corks that were really tight.

My wife gave me the corkscrew shown below nearly three years ago and it's by far the best one I've ever used. (I've used all styles.) It still looks and performs the way it did when it was brand new. It comes with a lifetime guarantee and I never expect to use any other corkscrew. Like all All-Clad kitchen gear I've owned, it's the best of its kind that I've ever used. It's so durable that if I were to buy it today, I would probably buy a used one if the seller is reputable. If I had bought this one or one made as well decades ago, it would have cost me a lot less money in the long run. That's because I had to eventually throw away all the other cork screws when they broke.

https://www.amazon.com/All-Clad-Extractor-Corkscrew-Wine-Opener/dp/B07FHZ8HYV/ref=sr_1_1?crid=3D4RIE1RZM8MJ&dchild=1&keywords=all-clad+corkscrew&qid=1616088352&sprefix=all-clad+cork,aps,149&sr=8-1

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Works well, but slower than all 3 above, and the teflon wears off the screw rendering the thing inoperable.
That corkscrew, Jim, worked better than most but still faltered with composite corks that were really tight.

My wife gave me the corkscrew shown below ...

Thanks for your advice, folks. I am tempted by the one Mike recommends, but I can buy 7 of the ones Lettie Teague recommended for that price. I know, you get what you pay for...
 
Joined
May 27, 2005
Messages
9,711
Location
Clearwater, Florida
Corkscrews
Excuse me while I change the subject. Lettie Teague's wine column in today's online Wall Street Journal is about corkscrews. Since I've never been really happy with the one I've been using the last several years, I was interested.

This is the one she recommends in the moderate price category. Have any of you tried anything like it?

Then, back to the regularly scheduled programming...

Jim, I read that article last week with great interest. Like Lettie, I have a variety of corkscrews for different occasions. I've settled on an imitation Laguiole someone bought me which is quite attractive and very functional. I've had a Rabbit opener that she also describes and agree that it is too heavy and bulky. I've used the electric opener numerous times at a ski condo (very unsatisfying). Finally, I do have a ah-so opener which has been a lifesaver when faced with older, drier corks which might disintegrate with a traditional corkscrew.
 
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9,711
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I used the type with two prongs for years until the time the composite cork was so hard and tight that inserting the prongs between it and the top of the bottle broke the bottle.
Wow. I've never tried the Ah-so two pronged extractor on synthetic corks. My wine key works best on those. My Ah-so only comes out for older bottles with a standard cork. I'm sure it's save me on several occasions with corks over 20 years old on some pricey cabs.
 
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I just now received a shipment of Amarone that, though it was released at $45, I bought it for $25. Wine Spectator says it's really good. Even if it's not as great as a really wonderful Amarone, I really can't go wrong at that price. The company that sold it to me included the following in their write-up: "You'll want to decant for at least an hour, then buckle up."

The best Amarone I've had in years, though it has been that long since I've had a real Amarone as opposed to the many relatively inexpensive Amarones that meet the regulatory requirements but not the reputation of a true Amarone. I drank two sips and immediately ordered more of it while it was still available. Its price at $25 is ridiculously cheap.

I forgot to decant it and once I was ready to drink it didn't want to wait. Now that I've enjoyed it so much, I actually wonder if decanting would remove the fresh, fruity characteristic. I'll find out tomorrow when my wife and I drink the rest of the bottle, which by then will have gone through the equivalent of a decanting process.
 
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I did taste some [Amarone] at a wine tasting last year, along with a Barolo, but I don't remember my impressions.

To be more precise, your post is dated November 4, 2019. Please allow me to remind you. :D

The first one [a Prosecco] and the two Amarones were the stars of the show today.

I liked the Nebbiolo. It was quite complex, but it was served in the same flight with the Zeni Amarone which outclassed it significantly

There ya go!
 
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