Wine

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Wine Spectator reported today that "Napa Valley's Duckhorn Vineyards became a publicly traded company on the New York Stock Exchange today when it began offering 20 million shares of common stock at an initial asking price of $15 a share. It opened at $18.60 this morning. Its trading symbol is NAPA. Duckhorn's IPO makes it the first major wine company to go public since the late 1990s, a move that potentially marks a new chapter in the history of California wine but raises numerous challenges."
 
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As I enjoyed a favorite bottle of California Chardonnay last night, I was thinking about how much everyday options in that state's Chardonnay have changed over time. Ten or more years ago, I couldn't reliably find a Chardonnay that I really looked forward to drinking unless it cost at least $30 and was made in France or South Africa. California, South America and Australia were primarily making big, buttery Chardonnays whereas I've always preferred the brighter, more acidic Chardonnays whether they are relatively big or light. Fast forward to today when it's relatively easy to find California Chardonnays made in that style. Indeed, my favorite everyday Chardonnay these days is light and bright, made in California, and costs only $14.
 
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As I enjoyed a favorite bottle of California Chardonnay last night, I was thinking about how much everyday options in that state's Chardonnay have changed over time. Ten or more years ago, I couldn't reliably find a Chardonnay that I really looked forward to drinking unless it cost at least $30 and was made in France or South Africa. California, South America and Australia were primarily making big, buttery Chardonnays whereas I've always preferred the brighter, more acidic Chardonnays whether they are relatively big or light. Fast forward to today when it's relatively easy to find California Chardonnays made in that style. Indeed, my favorite everyday Chardonnay these days is light and bright, made in California, and costs only $14.
We have similar taste in Chardonnay. Some of the "buttery" instances remind me of cream soda. I'm pretty ignorant of the "proper" descriptions of wine characteristics but I'm pretty sure "notes of Fanta cream soda" is not a good thing.
 
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In the interest of social distancing, I have only visited my local wine merchant three times in 2020. Hence I've somewhat depleted my cellar. Will there be any assistance from our government for those of us who have depleted our cellars in the name of public health? 🍷 :D🍷
 

kilofoxtrott

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Pino Magma - a kind of grapes or just a brand?

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Kind regards
Klaus
 
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I was watching Magnum PI today (the new one, not Tom Selleck) and there was a scene in the 'Robins Nest' wine cellar. There are two people living there and there were maybe 1000 bottles of wine. I'm not a wineologist(?), but doesn't wine have a shelf life, a few years at best?
 
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specific examples?

Corsage Chardonnay -- I've been paying $14 including taxes and shipping through the First Leaf wine club for the 2019 vintage. It's made in Paso Robles. Consider jumping all over it at $7 for the 2017 vintage: https://www.vivino.com/corsage-chardonnay/w/6284327 Considering that it's already four years old, drink it right away.

Look for any California Chardonnay that is described as bright and acidic. That description is usually to let us know that it's in contrast to the heavy, buttery style of so many California Chardonnays, especially those made in Napa Valley. A lot of the lighter, brighter wines seem to be made in the Russian River Valley but they're also made in other areas.

Hopefully others will offer suggestions.
 
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doesn't wine have a shelf life, a few years at best?

Depending on the wine, some will have a short shelf life and others will have a long one. The shortest I can think of off the top of my head is that a Beaujolais Nouveau is best enjoyed within one year and ideally only a few months. Contrast that with the great Cabernet Sauvignons that can last as much as 30 years, and the very rare examples can last 50 years or more. The really good (and expensive) dessert wines and fortified wines can easily last 25 to 50 years.

In general, the average white wine that costs about $15 - $20 will be fine for three to five years and the average red wine that costs $20 to $25 will be fine for five to eight years. The more money you spend, the more important it becomes to ask about it so you don't end up wasting your money.

For more detailed information, check out https://winefolly.com/tips/cellar-wine-guide/
 
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This is Vouvray from the 1940s which the winemaker said was still wonderful in 2014.

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