Wine

Joined
Sep 13, 2007
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20,987
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Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
The best tiny selection of wine I've ever seen for buying high-end wine. Almost all red wine costs $30 or more and justifiably so. Fancy's Market is a small grocery store located in Cape Cod's Osterville. The building was built 10 - 15 years before the Civil War.

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Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
20,987
Location
Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
I just now learned about a type of cork remover that I had never seen. It's a combination corkscrew and puller. A master sommelier used it to open a bottle of wine that was 40 years old, suspecting that he had to be very careful when removing the cork. If you're interested, begin watching the following video at 1:50:

 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
25,054
Location
SW Virginia
. My search has turned into an organising mission though so it'll be awhile.
Ahhhh, yes! I love completion of wine management. I have to do it about once each month or two.

Believe it or not, that's one thing I never have to do as I'm pretty disciplined about how I store wine.

I have two tall racks against the back wall of my wine cellar. On the left I have only reds: Zinfandel on the top shelf, Pinot Noir on the second, Malbec and Merlot on the third, and Cabernet Sauvignon on the bottom two.

On the right, the top shelf is assorted whites: Sauvignon Blanc, Grüner Veltliner, Sauternes, etc, then two shelves of Chardonnay, and at the bottom, two shelves of Italian reds with the best stuff at the bottom.

On the side wall is a rack of everyday wine, mostly mid-priced Chardonnay and Cabernet.

The remainder of my life is not so organized, except computer files.
 
Joined
Jun 3, 2009
Messages
6,341
Location
Chicago "burbs"
I have a case of champagne and a few bottles of white burgundy in my cellar and that's it. The rest are red, mostly in cases. Burial and subsequent forgetting about wine in my cellar has become a successful part of my red wine aging process. If I know they're there, I'll drink them early. Back to work.
 
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
20,987
Location
Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
My problem is that I have one small wine refrigerator that holds only 50 bottles of high-end wine and another one that holds only 75 bottles of the daily wines, leaving about 100 bottles of daily wine stored in two kitchen cabinets, one for red wine and the other for white wine. Though every row in the wine refrigerators is designated for certain types of wines, I have to change those designations every once in a while to accommodate daily wine being moved from the kitchen to its refrigerator and the changes being made in high-end wine due to consuming and purchasing the stuff.
 
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Joined
Sep 19, 2011
Messages
1,276
Location
Ireland
I just now learned about a type of cork remover that I had never seen. It's a combination corkscrew and puller. A master sommelier used it to open a bottle of wine that was 40 years old, suspecting that he had to be very careful when removing the cork. If you're interested, begin watching the following video at 1:50:

Love the reaction at 4:14 after the inital tasting - it could be either he thinks it's putrid but can't declare that or genuine love for it - I guess it's the latter but I found that amusing.
We cleared out an old house last year after a passing and came across a similar gadget - we recognised the conventional wine opener but not the supplementary device so duly discarded it - oh well...one lives and learns
 
Joined
May 27, 2005
Messages
9,901
Location
Clearwater, Florida
Didn't that look just like he used a simple screw that he placed deep into the cork followed by the Ah So over the top? I never thought of that combo, but could see how that would work with an old and fragile cork. Interesting!
 
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
20,987
Location
Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
Didn't that look just like he used a simple screw that he placed deep into the cork followed by the Ah So over the top?

The two devices, when their tops are inserted at right angles to each other, become a pair. That makes the pair probably easier to operate than two independent devices not manufactured to work together being used at the same time.
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2005
Messages
29,610
Location
Moscow, Idaho
The two devices, when their tops are inserted at right angles to each other, become a pair. That makes the pair probably easier to operate than two independent devices not manufactured to work together being used at the same time.
I wasn't sure if the 2 are a set or just a convenient pair. Looks like the screw holds the cork together and the 2-prong does the extraction.
 
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
20,987
Location
Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
Looks like the screw holds the cork together and the 2-prong does the extraction.

I'm not a physics expert, so I don't pretend to fully comprehend the dynamics at play. My intuition, flawed as it may be, tells me that the 2-prong device holds the cork together much like a pair of pliers and the screw prevents the cork from being inadvertently pushed into the bottle when inserting the two prongs after inserting the screw. It's difficult to determine from the video whether the user extracts the cork by pulling both at the same time or by primarily pulling one or the other.
 
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