Woman Severely Gored by Bison She Was Photographing in Yellowstone

Joined
Oct 17, 2007
Messages
24,398
Location
Orland Park, Illinois
I've witnessed countless acts of stupidity while visiting Yellowstone over the years. One time I saw a man and his boy chase a bear down a trail to get a closer look. Another time a couple and their young son approached to within about 20 feet of a moose that was standing along the road. Close encounters with bison are almost the norm. One time I saw a couple walk right past a sign that warned visitors not to proceed any further as rocks were unstable along the edge of an area near Upper Falls of the Yellowstone River. These are just a few of the highlights that come to mind.

Glenn
 
Joined
Jun 22, 2016
Messages
833
Location
Sugar Land, Texas
I was in GSMNP a few years ago. As I was leaving Cade’s Cove one evening, a lot of people were moving in the same direction. I stopped a park ranger and asked what was going on. His response was there was a mother bear and he cubs up ahead. He was there to make sure the bears did not feel threatened by tourist trying to get too close.

Wild life and stupidity do not mix.
 
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
71
Location
Minnesota
Video shown on the news from other campers shows the situation right up to the charge. Most background commentary was pretty much “what is she doing?” Those bison were within a couple of yards from the group of campers. Must be tame, eh?
 
Joined
May 11, 2006
Messages
43,242
Location
CHARLOTTE
Real Name
Randy
i think we have gone way too far with this. I don't think it's entertaining or funny to watch a scared animal attack a scared woman. Let's close this thread
 
Joined
Aug 2, 2007
Messages
572
Location
Lake City, Colorado
Sad that she was injured, even sadder about what will happen to the bison...
Chances are nothing will happen to him. If a wild animal acts according to nature, they are seldom put down. It's when their actions are not normal they are destroyed. Some years ago, a man in my town had a large exotic cat farm. One of his helpers was killed by a jaguar as he was leaving the cage after feeding him. It was determined the man, against training and proper procedure, turned his back to the cat as he was leaving the cage. That's when the cat pounced. The sheriff concluded the cat turned to his natural instincts, attacking from behind. Therefore, the cat lived. Had the cat killed him while backing away, the cat would have been put down. Let's hope the bison gets the same consideration.
 
Joined
Dec 3, 2012
Messages
6,552
Location
N Idaho
“The series of events that led to the goring suggest the bison was threatened by being repeatedly approached to within 10 feet,” said Yellowstone’s senior bison biologist Chris Geremia. “Bison are wild animals that respond to threats by displaying aggressive behaviors like pawing the ground, snorting, bobbing their head, bellowing, and raising their tail. If that doesn’t make the threat (in this instance it was a person) move away, a threatened bison may charge. To be safe around bison, stay at least 25 yards away, move away if they approach, and run away or find cover if they charge.”

When you enter the park you’re handed a sheet of paper that has the recommendations on safe distances to stay away from the wildlife. Late last year we driving thru the park on our way to Jackson and had to slow down to a crawl by a small group of bison on the side of the road. A crowd of about 20+ people had gathered around one if them and they were taking turns taking selfies with the animal, getting within 5 feet to take their phone photos, the group was less than 15 feet from the one being photographed. Mari was driving and as we very slowly drove by I mentioned to the the crowd they were too close to the animal. I heard a few of them tell me to mind my own business, usually with one or more expletives tossed in for emphasis.
There isn’t much you can do about bad behavior. The park should look into contracting with Disney, get a few animatronic bears, bison, elk and wolves built and station them at popular tourist spots for photos. Maybe people would leave the wildlife alone, given all they seem to want is a photo op.

,
 
Joined
Mar 25, 2011
Messages
2,704
Location
London
We get quite a few people misbehaving in Richmond park every year.
The deers can be quite protective while being very attractive to visitors, old and young.
City folks are simply not as aware of these issues as rural folks are.
When younger living in the countryside in France we knew how close we should get to cows who did not know us, how to walk across their territory, same for other farm animals.
We were taught what to do when encountering hornets, bees and wasps...

Nowadays hiking incidents happen too often as this type of knowledge is no longer transmitted to a larger population that has more spare time, is more mobile and is seeking and sharing individual experiences on a global scene.
 

Growltiger

Administrator
Administrator
Joined
Apr 26, 2008
Messages
12,733
Location
Up in the hills, Gloucestershire, UK
While on a walk yesterday we passed through a field which had a warning sign - with a picture - saying "Beware of the sheep". Sure enough as soon as we climbed over the stile two sheep rushed up. They were large and one had substantial antlers. We stood still and after they had checked us out they decided we were OK and left us alone.
I had checked immediately and they were both female. A little known fact is that more people are killed here (in the UK) by sheep each year than by bulls. Rams are fast, heavy and powerful. Bulls are usually friendly so long as you don't get between them and their harem and don't have a dog.
 
Joined
Mar 16, 2005
Messages
3,126
Location
Alaska
Back in the early 60's, we were in the park. Black bears were a real nuisance then, as many visitors would feed them, so they approached people with no fear. We saw a man trying to push a bear into a car next to his wife to take a photo. It ended up with many black bears being destroyed, and major education to people to not feed or approach bears.
 
Joined
Mar 16, 2005
Messages
3,126
Location
Alaska
I was a law enforcement ranger in Mount McKinley NP (now Denali) in the 70's. I also did bear management, which involved harassing bears (brown /grizzly) close to campgrounds. Once, there was a bear that was walking towards one of the major campgrounds. I took out my 12 gauge shotgun, loaded with cracker shells (shells which fire a large firecracker about 100 yards, but most effective range was 25-50 yards.) People in the campground saw me with the gun, and began following me. I asked them to please return to their campsites, and be ready to get in their vehicles. Still, assuming I would protect them with the shotgun, some still followed me. Well, I shot the bear with the shell cracker, it hit it in the shoulder, and bounced over the bear and exploded on the other side, driving the bear towards the campground, rather than away. I ran and intercepted the bear, and pelted it with rocks, while having slugs in the gun just in case. The rocks worked, and it moved away from the campground.
 
Joined
Mar 16, 2005
Messages
3,126
Location
Alaska
Bison can seem calm, but they are extremely fast and agile. They can outmaneuver a horse. I was a ranger in Theodore Roosevelt NP, and we had bison. We were asked to sometimes try to move one out of a campground. You can sometimes yell, and wave something (still not close to them!) and they would hopefully move out of the campground. I also found that revving the car engine would often work as well. I never enjoyed harassing them, nor the bears in a previous post. I worked in the parks because I love nature. When I quit the NPS in 1979, I began a career as a wildlife photographer. I worked for NGS for 4 years, doing 8 assignments, and then began working on my own, covering wildlife in 25 other countries besides the US. I am now retired.
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2005
Messages
26,321
Location
Moscow, Idaho
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #40
I was a law enforcement ranger in Mount McKinley NP (now Denali) in the 70's. I also did bear management, which involved harassing bears (brown /grizzly) close to campgrounds. Once, there was a bear that was walking towards one of the major campgrounds. I took out my 12 gauge shotgun, loaded with cracker shells (shells which fire a large firecracker about 100 yards, but most effective range was 25-50 yards.) People in the campground saw me with the gun, and began following me. I asked them to please return to their campsites, and be ready to get in their vehicles. Still, assuming I would protect them with the shotgun, some still followed me. Well, I shot the bear with the shell cracker, it hit it in the shoulder, and bounced over the bear and exploded on the other side, driving the bear towards the campground, rather than away. I ran and intercepted the bear, and pelted it with rocks, while having slugs in the gun just in case. The rocks worked, and it moved away from the campground.
Over the years my (former) colleagues and I have had 100s of our former students go to work for the National Park Service, US Forest Service, US Fish and Wildlife Service and many state equivalents of these. They have shared 1000's of stories and statistics like yours. I began my career as a wildlife biologist and soon migrated to what we called the human dimensions of wildlife—the animals were doing just fine, it was the people who needed studying and needed help. On a study looking at public attitudes and beliefs about bears in Yosemite NP, we documented many cases of people who could (or would) never learn the simple rules about how to behave around bears and how to use food lockers for storage, and suffered multiple bear break-ins of their cars because they left food in them. Bears learned that Subarus, with no window frames, were easy to get into!

Yup, stupidity is species specific, and the more evolved a species gets the more concentrated stupidity becomes in certain members of that species,
 
Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Nikon Cafe is a fan site and not associated with Nikon Corporation.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Copyright © 2005-2019 Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom