Worth upgrading from Epson 1400 to 2880?

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I have an Epson Stylus Photo 1400 printer that I have had for about 2 years. It has given no problems, but I have never been bowled over by the print quality, and I do have trouble getting colors to come out accurately.

Now I have a rebate certificate worth $250 on a new Epson 2880. That brings cost down to $350. I will need to buy ink for the 1400 before too long, and a complete set costs $128, so that is like an additional $100 rebate.

Is the 2800 that much better than a 1400? I realize that the 2880 is about to be discontinued and a newer model is already available.
 
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Maybe worth looking at a few reviews for instance http://www.photo-i.co.uk/Reviews/printers/Epson_R2880/page-1.html.

One difference is the 2880 uses pigment ink (8 or 9 cartridges if you include swapping the blacks) whereas the 1440 uses dye (6). Theoretically using more inks should improve colour reproduction and currently some printers are using 12 ink cartridges.

Accurate colours should be achievable with most printers but it does require some effort on proper calibration monitor, good profiles and correct viewing conditions print to screen.
 
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Thanks, Tony. I have been reading reviews, and my take is that the 2880 will print more detailed images and might be easier to color manage. It has the downside of requiring a change of the black inks when switching from glossy to matte paper. That is not an issue for me as I never print on matte.

The review you referenced is very thorough - thanks for the link. It is also very complimentary on the 2880. It was written in 2008, however, and makes no comparison to my current printer, the 1400.
 
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Jim, I was hoping that someone who had made the transition from 1400 to 2880 may have stepped forward by now. Until such times a few thoughts:

1. The 1400 inks are dye base rather than the pigment inks of the 2880.

2. The K3 pigment inks have a better archival life than most dye based.
But of course the quoted lifetimes of such inks are based on artificial tests

3. Compare the ink volume vs costs for both printers may help you to make a decision

4. By all accounts the 1400 is capable of first class prints as is the 2880 so without experience of either I would not like to make a call on this

5. I am not sure why one printers colour management should be any easier than another, other than printer driver settings being different between models.
With a correctly calibrated monitor, a colour managed app such as LR or Photoshop, soft proofing, correct print viewing lighting, and good icc profiles for your chosen paper you should be all set to produce stunning prints that match closely to screen :wink::smile:

There is a review of your 1400 on the same site unfortunately there is no side by side comparison so I guess it is of not much help, but just in case ...http://www.photo-i.co.uk/Reviews/interactive/Epson 1400/Page_1.html
 
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Thanks, Tony. You make some good points. I have read about the difference in lifetimes of the two type of Epson inks, and both seem plenty long enough for me. I don't print enough that the cost of ink is a terribly important factor.

Perhaps I should have another go at trying to get good colors with the 1400. The colors come out too red on Epson Glossy paper, and they are much worse when printing from PS CS 5 than from PS Elements 10. My monitor (a 27" iMac) is calibrated frequently, and doesn't drift much anyway.
 
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If you are not printing regularly you may want to find out how many prints you will need to feed through your printer to keep it functioning without print head clogging or more permenant head damage. Some suggestions are to run at least one test print per week through a printer that is not used often as well as some requiring constant power on to run nozzle checks etc.

The problem with colour differences between CS5 and PSE sound odd as I would have expected a very similar colour management engine betwee the two products, but I have not tried PSE for years so have no way of knowing.

If you use soft proofing in CS5 and have selected the correct (and good!) paper profile you should be able to see in the soft proof window a pretty accurate representation of how the image will look after printing to your particular paper. Red or Magenta casts with Epson printers suggest potential double profiling as one cause. Or a bad/corrupted profile, which seems unlikely as you would use the same profile with both CS5 and PSE?

Anyway if you have another go and you get problems just ask the question and if possible provide a shot of the problem print and we will try and help
 
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Tony, I have had this printer at least two years, maybe three, and to my amazement I've never had a jet clog. And sometimes it goes a month or two without any use.
 
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Jim in that case perhaps you should give some consideration to a change to pigment inks and potential impact to your working methods and running costs.

I believe it is still the case that pigment inks are more prone to clogging, although the ink formulations for pigment such as Epson K3 are said to be much better. IMHO this is a good reason why third party inks should generally be avoided.
 

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