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Yet another what should I do/charge question?

Discussion in 'Making Money' started by creationsbe, Aug 5, 2009.

  1. Okay,

    I have been contact by 2 "higher-ups" about a photo I took and placed on a Facebook Fanpage, it has gotten some positive attention, which has turned into important people finding it.

    I have allowed them to use the photo with my logo intact freely on webpages/newsletters, I see it as publicity for myself.

    What would you charge to give full rights to a company that is being paid $14 million on the construction project?
     
  2. lossy

    lossy

    502
    Feb 28, 2009
    ogden
    You have to consider if you will be considered a team player if you refuse.
     
  3. You charge by usage. Full rights as in they want the digital file to do with as they please? You need to find out how they plan to use it. What if you sell it for $250 and they make huge prints and sell them for $2000 a piece and sell 40? Or in a book and make millions. You really need to know how it will be used.
     
  4. Thanks for the input. I have some thinking to do, now that you put it to me that way. :) 
     
  5. I am confused about your "team player" comment. Are the people who want to use your image your bosses? Do you work for the company? Was the shot taken on company time using company equipment?

    In a perfect world, if one produces an image on his own time that had nothing to do with his job, then it is certainly appropriate to seek compensation for commercial use of the image. That said, with the economy the way it is right now and with unemployment at such unprecedented levels, people are adjusting their thinking on how to act at work. If you are concerned about the long term viability of your job and if you think that allowing the boss to use the photo for free will cause him to look more favorably upon you, then that is a different part of the puzzle. Just keep in mind that bosses are notorious for having short memories of employee accomodations and you may give away the photo and be laid off anyway. You will have nothing in writing.

    Tough call if it is your company that is seeking the use of the photo. If it is not your company, but a stranger, then you would be crazy to allow commerical useage without being paid. And I agree with Hotrod that it is seldom wise to sell complete rights to an image. Sell the rights for a specific use.

    Love to hear what you decide.
     
  6. Hmm, I didn't realize that you work for this company. Since they KNOW you are not a working pro photog, it may be harder to get a good fee. Ask them how much they normally pay for a photo. Or just throw out a number and see if they bite.

    It also depends on what the image is worth to you? Is it an image anyone else would be interested in? Such as a photo of the NY skyline? Or is it just their building or something that is of value to them only?

    The first has more value to you, and the second has very little value to you, beyond what they will pay. Therefore the first would be sold for a much higher price than the second.
     
  7. 1% ? sounds small but you get a nice check :tongue::tongue:
     
  8. No no no, I don't work for the company. The company is doing construction work on our University Football Stadium. They contacted me about using it in their company advertisement. The photo includes the stadium, their crane with company name and a strike of lightening from a recent storm.

    I am completely independent, I don't work for them. :)  Thanks for the replies and opinions, I appreciate it. I will let you all know what happens.
     
  9. Sounds like a very unique image! Can you share it?
     
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