Share Your Favorite Photography Myths, Misnomers and the Like

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Yeah, I don't think it's a rule, so to speak. I've usually seen photographers who think they're the end-all/be-all who like to make fun of photographers who chimp. It's silly to do that. I like to check my histogram and/or "blinkies" from time to time to make sure I'm exposing correctly. It's one of the many benefits of digital over film - you don't have to wait until your roll of film has been printed to see if you've messed up.

So yeah, I chimp. Lol!
Exactly. My first impression when I started with digital was "Wow, instant contact sheets!"
 
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Another myth: Stop using a polarizer filter because you can easily get the same effect during post-processing. (A salesman in a brick-and-mortar photography store told me that.) While that's true about darkening the blue part of a sky, it's not at all easy to reduce or eliminate glare in the other parts of a landscape scene. The same issue also applies to lots of other types of scenes.
 
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Another myth: Stop using a polarizer filter because you can easily get the same effect during post-processing. (A salesman in a brick-and-mortar photography store told me that.) While that's true about darkening the blue part of a sky, it's not at all easy to reduce or eliminate glare in the other parts of a landscape scene. The same issue also applies to lots of other types of scenes.
Yeah, you can darken the sky in post but there is a lot of glare in clouds as well and the polarizer produces a much more dramatic definition in the clouds.
 
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I was just now reminded of the myth that long focal lengths compress the scene. This is not true. If we compare an image that was captured using a long lens with an image that was captured using a 50mm lens and cropped to match the first image, they will look the same with regard to so-called compression.
 
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Use exposure compenstion and adjust until you just see blinkies- that will be the perfect exposure.
I am still learning how limited our exposure evaluation is when shooting raw. I have been looking at my files with raw digger, which is a program that looks at raw file data. When my blinkies and histogram say I am overexposed- I actually have at least a full stop left to go. The histogram and blinkies is based on the embedded jpg. I was literally shocked how far off my exposure evaluation has been for the last 20 years. You lose a lot of data, and dynamic range- if you give away that last stop.
Gary
 
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You lose a lot of data, and dynamic range- if you give away that last stop.
I actually wonder what the practicalities are about what we're really giving up. Post-processing software is so much better about brightening scenes without creating artifacts than it used to be that I really have to wonder what if anything is being given away in that last stop.

Having said that, I completely agree with you about the myth that using the blinkies or even the histogram will result in the perfect exposure. Both are only guides that lead us in the right direction but neither are reliably so accurate that we shouldn't question them.
 
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Mike, you may have uncovered another myth. I suspect our sensors have gotten so much better in the last few years, that the data loss and noise increase that is seen with underexposure may no longer be evident. I personally tend to underexpose as I like dark blacks and deep rich colors. I do not notice noise or other issues.
But I was still shocked how much my histogram can be running up the right side- and in raw nothing is actually blown out. Looks terrible in the back of the camera- but looks great after processing and pulling the exposure down in post.
gary
 
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And we all know that the size of the glass affects how things are seen! :rolleyes:
You are allowed that mistake but only because it is still early in the morning on your side of the planet. It's the amount of wine that matters. When the size of the glass limits the amount of wine that can be drunk, multiple refills are the solution.
 

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