Z50 vs. D5500

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On a D5500 the screen, when swung out to the left, impinges on the L-bracket unless the L-bracket is mounted far to the left or else reversed to the more awkward right-hand side.
I don't find using the right side awkward at all. In fact, using it that way makes it far easier to insert cables into their ports because in that position the ports are facing up toward the user. There is also the alternative of not using an L-Bracket if it causes so many problems. I've never used one and didn't appreciate until now how beneficial that choice might be.
 
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I don't find using the right side awkward at all. In fact, using it that way makes it far easier to insert cables into their ports because in that position the ports are facing up toward the user.
On the right side the L-bracket blocks access to the memory card port, but of course you don't need access to that very often.

There is also the alternative of not using an L-Bracket if it causes so many problems. I've never used one and didn't appreciate until now how beneficial that choice might be.
How do you mount a camera on a tripod in portrait orientation w/o an L-bracket?

Added in edit: I guess you use the slot in the tripod head, but that is a bit restrictive.
 
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I guess you use the slot in the tripod head, but that is a bit restrictive.
Only in certain situations when an L-bracket is truly needed to solve that issue. Clearly, the L-bracket has its own restrictive characteristics when using an articulating screen in the vertical position, at least Nikon's screens. Like most situations, there is no silver bullet that solves all issues; ya gotta run with the device that solves the issues that are most important to you for whatever reason.
 
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My SmallRig L for my Z6 has a sliding side bracket—slick, stable and easy to use.
So does mine...and it's not a SmallRig:

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As you can see, it can be loosened or tightened with a coin. A quarter works well.

And that allows fold-out tilting and rotating at will:

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As you can see, it can be loosened or tightened with a coin. A quarter works well.

And that allows fold-out tilting and rotating at will:
Then we're back to being able to use the D5xx articulating screen with the camera in a vertical orientation whether using an L-bracket or not. Sounds good to me. If only my D7000 or Z6 had an articulating screen!
 
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But if you don't offset the camera on the L-bracket, you can still tilt the LCD screen out, but you can't rotate it as you are limited by the L-bracket:

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Did anyone notice the different white balance settings on the three photos I just posted? They were made with my iPhone just a minute or two apart. I don't understand this, but I've noticed it before.
 
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Jim,

Couldn't you lay the clamp over to the side & use the bottom plate on your camera? That may allow you to move the screen around w/o interference. The attached reference photo would allow the screen full motion if it were one a tripod, or even here with another adapter between the pate & the head.
 

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Jim,

Couldn't you lay the clamp over to the side & use the bottom plate on your camera? That may allow you to move the screen around w/o interference. The attached reference photo would allow the screen full motion if it were one a tripod, or even here with another adapter between the pate & the head.
Sure, but I prefer the solution shown in my 2nd photo.
 
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Here's the D5500and its fold-out LCD in action today:

IMG_0935_sm.jpg
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D55_4441.jpg
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Thank you showing this. It validates why I didn’t purchase the Platypod system during the launch on Kickstarter. It looks like it is working well for you!
Well, you have your own system which works fine for you. Do you use any sort of remote control for your camera when it's mounted upside-down?
 
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Well, you have your own system which works fine for you. Do you use any sort of remote control for your camera when it's mounted upside-down?
Yes, IMO, it does work well for me. For instance not all of the subjects I photograph on a photowalk are at ground level. Likewise, some of the locations I'm in when taking a photograph e.g. roots and/or bull ant nests, amongst other obstacles would make anything other than handheld, or using a tripod difficult. This is an old image, I now use Arca-swiss mounts on all my cameras and tripods.

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I also use ball-heads on all my tripods, so adjusting the composition is basically the same whether the camera is inverted or not. The ability to adjust the height of the camera using the centre column to fine-tune composition is also important for me.

To answer your question, yes, I do use a remote shutter release whenever a camera is mounted on a tripod. I usually stand back, and upright if the subject is low down. As most of my closeup/macros are focus stacks, I like to watch the bracketing as it happens, particularity watching for subject movement.

Unfortunately, Nikon like to make life difficult for the user when it comes to HDR and focus shifting/bracketing. Once you start to use cameras which make life easier for the user, it makes very little difference if the camera is inverted or not. I'm all about making my photography simple and fun.
 

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